aka What the hell is “female ejaculate?!”

You may have seen it in porn, or you may have experienced it yourself: the expelling of copious amounts of liquid through the urethra during orgasm, generally after the stimulation of the front wall of the vagina (aka the “G spot”).

Otherwise known as “squirting”.

The female sexual experience seems to be much more convoluted than the male sexual experience – large parts of our experience is hidden from view, for starters. It is surprising, therefore, that there is controversy surrounding the phenomenon of “female ejaculation”: here is a very visible sign of the sexual experience, and we still aren’t sure what it is or how it is produced! Because there are so many theories out there, we thought we would break them down.

Theory 1: Squirting is Urine
Squirting is pee The fluid that is squirted comes from the urethra, so it makes sense that it could be urine. Since urine comes from the bladder, one recent study conducted pelvic ultrasound scans on 7 women after they peed, and during sexual stimulation (both before and after squirting). They found that during sexual stimulation, the recently emptied bladder filled very rapidly, and was empty again after squirting occurred.

To be sure, urine samples were analyzed before sexual stimulation, and after squirting occurred. Urine contains urea, ceratinine, and uric acid: all of which were found in both the samples taken before sexual stimulation, and the squirted fluid. However, prostatic-specific antigen (PSA), a compound secreted by the Skene’s glands (which are often referred to as the “female prostate”), was also found in the squirted fluids of 5/7 of the women.

Why this theory is problematic:

  • Many women and their partners report that the fluid that is squirted during orgasm does not smell, look, or taste like urine.
  • Women say the sensation of squirting feels nothing like voiding their bladder
  • The study used only 7 women – that is a very small sample size

Conclusions

Although the sample size is small, the evidence is extremely convincing. The bladder was empty, filled up again very rapidly, and then was empty again.

Where did all that fluid go, if not out through the urethra?

The fact that the squirted fluid doesn’t smell, look, or taste like urine could be due to the fact that it is extremely diluted – the bladder fills so quickly that there isn’t time for the waste to accumulate in the urine. The highly diluted urine is mixed with PSA from the Skene’s glands when it exits the urethra, which could also contribute to the differing taste and smell.

Theory 2: Squirting is not Urine

skenes glands

The Skenes glands. (Photo from here)

Some studies purport that the fluid squirted during sexual stimulation is produced in the Skene’s glands (the female prostate), and is not, in fact, urine.

According to this study, the glands have long ducts that lead to the urethra. This leads to the possibility that the fluid squirted during sexual stimulation could have been produced in these glands, and travel to the urethra to be ejaculated. In this case, the squirted fluid would be mostly prostate secretions like PSA.

Why this theory is problematic:

  • The Skene’s glands are very small – it is unlikely they could produce and store the amount of fluid that is often squirted

Conclusions

As this OB/GYN states:

the Skene’s glands are tiny, about the size of a pea, and are just not physiologically capable of producing any more than a few milliliters of fluid at best

Although the wet spots many women experience are due to the secretions from the Skene’s glands, it seems unlikely that the copious amounts of liquid some women squirt could be produced from these tiny glands.

 

Theory 3: “Female Ejaculate” is Not Urine, but “Squirt” IS

This theory is mostly semantics. Some studies say that there needs to be a distinction made between the secretions that come from the Skene’s glands, and the large amounts of squirted fluid that comes from the urethra during sexual stimulation.

One study explains:

“…female ejaculation is the release of a very scanty, thick, and whitish fluid from the female prostate, while the squirting is the expulsion of a diluted fluid from the urinary bladder”

Secretions from Skene’s glands = female ejaculate (likely named since the Skene’s glands are often called the “female prostate”): milky, whitish, small quantity.

Squirted fluid = dilute urine: clear, larger quantity.

WHY DO WE CARE?

What do we even want to answer the question: “what is squirting”?

  1. Many women feel inadequate because they cannot squirt. Understanding what squirting really is might help them realize that it isn’t the magical unicorn of sexual experience.
  2. In our mind, more research is needed about the female sexual experience in general, so we see this research as a step in the right direction.

That being said, we don’t NEED to care.

If you squirt – is it pleasurable? Is it fun?

Then who cares what the chemical composition of the squirt is, or where it comes from?!

In fact, if it is diluted urine, does that make it any less a part of the sexual experience? (As in: “Oh, it’s just pee. That’s not sexy.”) No, of course not. It is no grosser or more weird than semen.


 If it’s pleasurable and fun, keep squirtin! (If it bothers you, or you think it might be indicative of other physiological problems, see your doctor!) If you have never squirted, don’t worry, you’re not any less of a sexual creature.


 

 

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